Portrait of the Prince de Wagram and his Daughter Malcy, 1837 (cat. no. 131)

November 12, 2012 § 2 Comments

Winterhalter 131 1837 Prince de Wagram

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873)

Portrait of Napoléon-Alexandre Berthier, 2e Prince et Duc de Wagram (1810-1887), with his daughter,

Mlle Malcy Berthier de Wagram, Princesse Murat (1832-1884)

1837, oil on canvas, 186.0 x 138.0 cm, Private Collection

Winterhalter’s portrait of  Napoléon-Alexandre Berthier, 2e Prince et Duc de Wagram, with his daughter, Mlle Malcy Berthier de Wagram, Princesse Murat was exhibited at the 1987/88 Winterhalter exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London and Petit Palais in Paris. Carol Blackett-Ord wrote in the exhibition catalogue regarding this portrait (p. 179):

“The Prince de Wagram is seated with his daughter, Malcy-Louise-Caroline-Frédérique on a Louis-XIII-style double seat. He wears a black double-breasted frock coat and black trousers with an instep under his shoe. His black silk cravat is held with a pearl pin. The girl wears a white silk and muslin frock, the bodice trimmed with lace, with crimson velvet bows at the sleeves and in her hair. With one leg tucked under her, she lays a trusting hand on her father’s sleeve. A greyhound looks up from the left, a symbol of fidelity and an allusion to family devotion.

“The painting marked a turning point in Winterhalter’s career in France. Hitherto, he had been celebrated for his genre work. At the 1838 Salon, Winterhalter showed three paintings, two of which were portraits… Henceforth, Winterhalter’s professional competence as a portrait artist was recognised. He could treat a life-size subject, and handle realism or affecting charm with equal success…

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg 2012.

Portrait of Graf von Langenstein und Gondelsheim, 1834 (cat. no. 97)

November 11, 2012 § Leave a comment

Winterhalter 097 1834 Graf von Langenstein

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873)

Portrait of Ludwig Graf von Langenstein und Gondelsheim (1820-1870)

1834, oil on canvas, 96.3 x 79.5 cm, Private Collection

Winterhalter’s portrait of Ludwig Graf von Langenstein und Gondelsheim was exhibited at the 1987/88 Winterhalter exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London and Petit Palais in Paris. Carol Blackett-Ord wrote in the exhibition catalogue regarding this portrait (p. 177):

” The boy leans cross-legged against a rock and turns a full gaze upon the spectator. He wears a black waistcoat under a short, waisted black jacket with a high shawl collar, dark brown trousers and carries a riding crop in his right hand. The landscape is sketched in autumnal colours against a sky of massing grey clouds. Winterhalter has captured the youthful vitality of his subject with great aplomb. The boy’s tousled hair, ruddy cheeks and parted lips combine to create an image of exceptional freshness and charm…”

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg 2012.

Portrait of Sophie Wilhelmine Großherzogin von Baden, c.1832 (cat. no. 69)

November 10, 2012 § Leave a comment

Winterhalter 069 1832 Sophie Wilhelmine of Baden

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873)

Portrait of Sophie Wilhelmine Großherzogin von Baden, née Princess of Sweden (1801-1865)

c. 1832, oil on canvas, 39.5 x 29 cm, The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Thomas L. Fawick Memorial Collection

Winterhalter’s portrait of Sophie Wilhelmine, Großherzogin von Baden, was exhibited at the 1987/88 Winterhalter exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London and Petit Palais in Paris. Carol Blackett-Ord wrote in the exhibition catalogue regarding this portrait (p. 176):

“In this small whole-length portrait, Grand Duchess Sophie of Baden stands in a white dress in a landscape. She is in the fashionable attire of the early 1830s, with broad puffed sleeves, ankle-length skirt and laced pumps. A brown paisley shawl accentuates her hour-glass silhouette, while her hairstyle culminates in an elaborate plaited ‘Apollo’ knot. She leans against a mossy boulder on which a portfolio of drawings has been laid, and flowers spill out of an upturned bonnet at her feet. Formally, the portrait encapsulates the perfect polish of Biedermeier taste, and yet the scene is also deeply Romantic: the beauty of the young woman is rendered poignant and vulnerable against the threatening dark of the forest.”

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg 2012.

Portrait of Leopold I, Großherzog von Baden, 1831 (cat.no. 54)

November 9, 2012 § 5 Comments

Winterhalter 054 1831 Leopold I of Baden

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873)

Portrait of Leopold I, Großherzog von Baden (1790-1852)

1831, oil on canvas, 232 x 150 cm, Private Collection

Winterhalter’s portrait of Leopold I, Großherzog von Baden, was exhibited at the 1987/88 Winterhalter exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London and Petit Palais in Paris. Susan Foster wrote in the exhibition catalogue regarding this portrait (p. 175):

“Leopold, Grand Duke of Baden, is portrayed at full-length against a landscape background. He wears a dark-blue coat with silver epaulettes, white knee breeches and black boots, with the yellow sash of the Order of the House of Baden over his shoulder, and on his left breast the cross of the Zahring Lion, the star of the Order of the House of Baden, and the star of the Karl Friedrich Order of Merit. In his left hand, he carried a plumed hat.

“One of at least two portraits of Leopold known to have been painted by Winterhalter, this is the more formal and least successful representation… He stands somewhat stiffly, a slight disproportion between the elongated legs and arms and short square torso and head detracting from the intended grandeur of the placing the upper part of the body against the sky…. This portrait may have had a pendant of the Grand Duchess Sophie, recorded only in the 1873 exhibition at Baden. ”

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg 2012.

Portrait of Karl Spindler, 1830 (cat. no. 53)

November 8, 2012 § 5 Comments

Winterhalter 053 1830 Karl Spindler

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873)

Portrait of Karl Spindler (1796-1855)

1830, oil on canvas, 70 x 58 cm, Private Collection

Winterhalter’s portrait of Karl Spindler was exhibited at the 1987/88 Winterhalter exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London and Petit Palais in Paris. Susan Foster wrote in the exhibition catalogue regarding this portrait (p. 175):

“This strikingly vigorous portrait of the writer, Karl Spindler, must have been painted when Spindler was resident in Munich between 1827 and 1832, at the same time that Winterhalter had made his base there. The Hussar’s uniform which Spindler wears reinforces his self-consciously artistic pose, giving the sitter a more romantic air which is perhaps borne out by the carefully tousled hair. The sense of movement implicit in the half-length pose with its jutting hand, in which the sitter is silhouetted against the sky, was not to be repeated in Winterhalter’s considerably more formal male portraits executed during his long career. The portrait of Spindler seems to indicate that Winterhalter’s male portraiture could have taken an entirely different direction. When the painting was exhibited at Baden in 1873, the critic of the Karlsruher Zeitung wrote that : “One painting from his earliest days, the portrait of the novelist Spindler, already carries the marks of a great master.” ”

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg 2012.

Architect Karl Josef Berckmüller, 1830 (cat. no. 43)

November 7, 2012 § Leave a comment

Winterhalter 043 1830 Berckmuller

Franz Xaver Winterhalter (1805-1873)

Portrait of Karl Josef Berckmüller (1800-79)

 1830, Munich, oil on canvas; 96 x 72.3 cms;  Musée de Picardie, Amiens

Winterhalter’s portrait of Karl Josef Berckmüller (1800-79) was exhibited at the 1987/88 Winterhalter exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London and Petit Palais in Paris. Carol Blackett-Ord wrote in the exhibition catalogue regarding this portrait (p. 174):

“The architect is poised, as if explaining a point on the plan before him, with his head turned to the right. The attributes of his profession, a ground plan and a set of callipers, are in front of him, but attention is focused upon a fine study of his hands. The diagonals of the crossed hands are echoed in the sitter’s splayed open collar. An atypical form of signature, with Roman letters and numerals, appear as though carved into the architectural background. There are good grounds for identifying the sitter in the portrait as Winterhalter’s close friend, Karl Josef Berckmüller. He had qualified as an architect the previous year, and had further established himself by marrying the daughter of Baron von Eichthal, Winterhalter’s great benefactor. The picture appears to be the Portrait of a Man, shown at the Public Art Exhibition at Karlsruhe in May 1832 (no. 82). It received qualified praise in Kunstblatt, 11 October 1832 : “The artist has reproduced here, as it were alla prima, the firm features of a handsome male face with great boldness and assurance. The likeness is so vivid that one believes one is seeing the original. With this portrait as in all Mr Winterhalter’s portraits, one must acknowledge his great talent for portraiture; but we cannot fail to comment adversely on the fact that this hasty manner of painting is unworthy of the great talent we have praised.” ”

Philip Mansel added the following biographical note on the sitter (ibid.): “Karl Josef Berckmüller (1800-79) was the son of a prominent builder of Karlsruhe, the capital of the Grand Duchy of Baden. He was, himself, to become a government architect. One of his most important works was the building to house the Grand Ducal Collections on the Friedrichsplatz in Karlsruhe.”

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg 2012.

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