Notes to Portrait of Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall, 1868 (no 842) [Part 4]

January 8, 2014 § Leave a comment

Avrorva Stjernvall Demidova 1868 Winterhalter

Notes to Portrait of Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall, 1868 (no 842) [Part 4]

As it has become customary with my blog entries, here is an abbreviated list of the sitter’s descendants, limited to the first three generations:

Eve Aurora Charlotta Stjernvall (Bjornesborg 7.08.1808-Helsinki 13.05.1902), m.1st 1836 Pavel Nikolaevich Demidov (1798-1840); m.2nd 1846 Andrei Nikolaevich Karamzin (1814-ka Crimea 1854)

1.  Pavel Pavlovich Demidov, 2nd Prince di San Donato (1839-1885); m.1st 1867 Princess Maria Elimovna Meshcherskaia (1844-1868); m.2nd St.Petersburg 1871 Princess Elena Petrovna Troubetzkaia (1853-1917)

1.1.  Elim Pavlovich Demidov, 3rd Prince di San Donato (1868-1943): m.1893 Countess Sofia Illarionovna Worontzova-Dachkova (1870-1953)

1.2. Nikita Pavlovich Demidov, Prince di San Donato (1872-1874)

1.3. Aurora Pavlovna Demidova, Princess di San Donato (1873-1904), m.1st 1892 (div.1896) HRH Prince Arsen of Yugoslavia (1859-1938); m.2nd 1897 Conte Palatin Nicola Giovanni Maria di Noghera (1875-1944)

1.3.1. HRH Paul, Prince of Yougoslavia (1893-1976), m.1923 HRH Olga, Princess of Greece & Denmark (1903-1997), having had issue, two sons and one daughter (descendants: Yugoslavia, Gaubert, Oxenberg, and Balfour families)

1.3.2. Helene Aurore di Noghera, Contessa Palatine di Noghera (1898-1967), m. Gaston Joseph Tissot (1891-1945), havin had issue, 1 son (descendants: Tissot Demidoff family)

1.4. Anatole Pavlovitch Demidov, 4th Principe di San Donato (1874-1943), m. 1894 Mlle Eugénie Podmener (1871-1958)

1.4.1.  Helena Anatolievna Demidova, Princess di San Donato (1901-1970), m.1926 Paul René Geoffroy (1903-1991) – s.p.

1.4.2. Eugénie Anatolievna Demidova, Princess di San Donato (1902-1955), m.1927 Jean Gerber (1905-1981), having had issue, one son (descendants: Gerber and Merrazzini families)

1.4.3. Aurora Anatolievna Demidova, Princess di San Donato (1909-1944), m.1933 Jean Giraud (1912-1962), having had issue, one daughter (descendants: Pouliot and Filion families)

1.5. Marie Pavlovna Demidova, Princess di San Donato (1877-1955), m.1897 Prince Semion Semeonovich Abamelek-Lazarev (1857-1916) – s.p.

1.6. Pavel Pavlovich Demidov, Prince di San Donato (1879-1909)

1.7. Elena Pavlovna Demidova, Princess di San Donato (1884-1959), m.1st 1903 (div.1907) Count Alexander Pavlovitch Shuvalov (1881-1935); m.2nd 1907 (div.1926) Nikolai Alexeievitch Pavlov (1866-1931)

1.7.1. Count Pavel Alexandrovich Shuvalov (1903-1960); m.1933 Anna Ivanovna Raevskaya (1903-1991), having had issue, one son (descendants: Shuvalov family)

1.7.2. Countess Elena Alexandrovna Shuvalova (1904-1992); m.1924 (div 1930) Prince Peter Alexandrovich Lieven (1887-1943); m.2nd Wilfred Noel Stubbs (1911-?), having had issue, one son (descendants: Stubbs family)

Sources: http://www.angelfire.com/realm/gotha/gotha/demidov.html [15/05/2012]; http://www.geneall.net [20/05/2012]; http://thepeerage.com [20/05/2012]; http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famille_Demidoff [2/01/2014]; http://genroy.free.fr/demidoff.html [4/01/2014].

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, 2014

Notes to Portrait of Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall, 1868 (no 842) [Part 3]

January 7, 2014 § Leave a comment

Avrorva Stjernvall Demidova 1868 Winterhalter

Notes to Portrait of Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall, 1868 (no 842) [Part 3]

As it has become customary with my blog entries, here is an abbreviated ancestry of the sitter, limited to the first three generations:

  1. Eve Aurora Charlotta Stjernvall (Bjornesborg 7.08.1808-Helsinki 13.05.1902)
  2. Carl Johann Stjernvall (1764-1815), m.1799
  3. Eva Gustava von Willebrand (1784-1844)
  4. Erik Johan Stjernvall (1724-1777), m.
  5. Catharina Elisabet Nonneman (1744-1791)
  6. Ernst Gustav von Willebrand (1751-1809), m.1778
  7. Vendla Gustava von Wright (1755-1820)
  8. Erik Wallwik Stjernvall (1685-1754), m.
  9. Brita Hirvo (1695-1754)
  10. Carl Frederick Nonneman (?-?), m.
  11. Gertrud Katharina Hoetz (?-?)
  12. Ernst Gustav von Willebrand (1726-1784), m.
  13. Sofia Catarina Jägehorn af Spurila (1727-1791)
  14. Georg Henrik von Wright (1723-1797), m.1750
  15. Vendela Regina Borgström (1726-1776)

 

Sources: http://gw.geneanet.org [4/01/13]; http://www.geneall.net [4/01/13]

To be continued…

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, 2014

Notes to Portrait of Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall, 1868 (no 842) [Part 2]

January 6, 2014 § Leave a comment

Avrorva Stjernvall Demidova 1868 Winterhalter

Notes to Portrait of Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall, 1868 (no 842) [Part 2]

For those who understand Russian, there’s a delightful lecture about Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina by Mikhail Kostolomov on YouTube – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMezq1KjbRM; and an in-depth article about her at http://www.vbrg.ru/articles/istorija_vyborga/istoricheskie_lichnosti_nashego_goroda/avrora_karamzina/.

Avrora Karlovna Stjernvall, a daughter of a Finnish governor, frequently travelled to St Petersburg, where her beauty and intelligence caused sensation. Most prominent Russian poets, such as Pushkin and Lermontov, dedicated verses to her, and the Emperor Nikolai I appointed her as a lady-in-waiting to his wife, Empress Alexandra Feodorovna. In 1836 she married the fabulously wealthy Pavel Nikolaevich Demidov, the owner of extensive mines and factories in the resource-rich Ural region of Russia. However, too much of a good life impacted his health, and Demidov died only four years after their marriage. The fortune smiled again on Avrova, when she fell in love and married in 1846 Andrei Nikolaevich Karamzin. However, their happiness was also short lived, as in 1854 Karamzin was killed in the Crimean War.

Avrova Karlovna never remarried, but concentrated on the upbringing of her only son, Pavel Pavlovich Demidov, and took an active part in the management of the family fortunes and business affairs. While her family palace in St Petersburg, with its rounds of balls and dinners, became a prestigious rendezvous place for the social and artistic elite of the Russian Empire, Avrova Karlovna also used her immense fortune to help innumerable charities, and endow various welfare, health, and educational institutions in Russia as well as in her native Finland. She was fated to outlive her only son as well as his first wife, and one of her grandchildren, dying in 1902 a few months short of her 94th birthday.

In spite of the wealth and stature of the sitter, her portrait by Franz Xaver Winterhalter appears rather understated. However, it fits among other portraits by Winterhalter of the era. In the middle of the 1860s, the years of hard work and constant travel around Europe and across the Channel (and think of the travel conditions in those days!) took their toll on Winterhalter’s health; and in 1865 he became seriously ill. Henceforth he undertook extended trips to health spas and holiday resorts, and painted significantly less. With a few notable exceptions, large-scale, full- and three-quarter-length portraits became rare in his oeuvre, and the artist concentrated more and more on smaller, more intimate half-length and head-and-shoulder portraits.

Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina is shown accordingly in a head-and-shoulders format, appearing close to the viewer within the intimate setting of the vignette-like oval portrait. Her hair is parted in the middle and gathered low at the nape to emphasise the fashionably correct oval of her face. The jewellery is minimal, and limited to earrings and a single string of pearls. While Avrora Karlovna is shown décolleté, a lace head-dress modestly descends covering her shoulders. As I have seen neither the original portrait nor the colour photograph of it, I can only presume that it is carried out in a sombre palette, comparable to Winterhalter’s portraits of Mme Mélanie Goldschmidt (1834-1894) (Louvre) and Countess Genowefa Puslowska (1821-1867) (Collegium Maius), both of which were also painted in 1868. Such encapsulation of Avrora Karlovna also fits within the preferred depiction of widows and ‘women of a certain age’ during the second half of the nineteenth century.

To be continued…

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, 2014

Notes to Portrait of Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall, 1868 (no 842)

January 5, 2014 § Leave a comment

Avrorva Stjernvall Demidova 1868 Winterhalter

Notes to Portrait of Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall, 1868 (no 842).

Dear Friends,

In June 2012, I published a post correcting the identity of the sitter in a portrait by Franz Xaver Winterhalter from Princess Mathilde Bonaparte (1820-1904) to Avrora Karlovna Demidova-Karamzina (1808-1902), née Stjernvall. For more details, please see https://franzxaverwinterhalter.wordpress.com/2012/06/28/franz-xaver-winterhalter-and-the-demidov-portrait/ .

I was thrilled to receive two emails, virtually on the New Year’s Eve, one from Alexandre Tissot Demidoff, and another from Tryggve Gestrin, of Esbo Stadsmuseum, Finland, confirming my re-identification.

Furthermore, they have informed me that in 2006, the Esbo Stadsmuseum hosted an exhibition dedicated to the sitter. The sitter’s descendants collaborated with the museum curators on the exhibition, and in the process shared rare and precious documents from the family archives.

One of the documents included an illustrated inventory from a residence of the sitter’s descendants… which included this portrait, thus irrefutably confirming the identity of the sitter.

I am most grateful to Alexandre Tissot Demidoff and Tryggve Gestrin for their assistance in my research!

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, 2014

PS: Does anyone have a colour image of this portrait?

Sitter’s Identity Corrected: Portrait of Princess Lina Gagarina, 1857 (cat no 590) [Part 4]

January 4, 2014 § Leave a comment

Lina Gurieva Gagarina 1857 Winterhalter

Sitter’s Identity Corrected: Portrait of Princess Lina Gagarina, 1857 (cat no 590) [Part 4]

As it has become customary with my blog entries, here is an abbreviated list of the sitter’s descendants, limited to the first three generations:

Countess Aleksandra (Lina) Nikolaevna Gurieva (St Petersburg 23.12.1825-Baden-Baden 21.12.1907[3.01.1908]), m. 1842(3?) Prince Nikolai Nikolaivich Gagarin (St Petersburg May 1822(3?)- Baden-Baden 22.01.1902)

Descendants:

1. Prince Viktor Nikolaevich Gagarin (1847-1912), m.1867 Baroness Maria Andreievna (Charlotte) von Budberg (1847-1917)

1.1. Princess Maria Viktorovna Gagarina (1870-1927)

1.2. Princess Sophia Viktorovna Gagarina (1872-1966)

1.3. Prince Nikolai Viktorovich Gagarin (1873-1925), m.1st 1895 Princess Maria Nikolaevna Trubetzkaia (1877-1924), m.2nd 1924 Ekaterina Illinichna Jakunina (1895-1962)

1.3.1. [1] Princess Sophia Nikolaevna Gagarina (1893-1970), m.1918 Sergei Mikhailovich Ossorgin (1888-1957), having had further issue, one son and three daughters.

1.3.2. [1] Princess Marina Nikolaevna Gagarina (1897-1984), m.1923 Prince Sergei Trubetzkoi (1890-1949), having had further issue, one son and three daughters.

1.3.3. [1] Princess Maria Nikolaevna Gagarina (1899-1940), m.1st 1922 (div) Prince Georgi Konstantinovich Shakhovskoy (1896-1977); m.2nd 1937 Count Konstantin Apollinarievich Chreptovich-Butenev (1912-1963), having had further issue, two sons and two daughters.

1.3.4. [1] Princess Tatiana Nikolaevna Gagarina (1900-07)

1.3.5. [1] Prince Viktor Nikolaevich Gagarin (1902-04)

1.3.6. [1] Prince Sergei Nikolaevich Gagarin (1904-58), m.1936 Countess Elisabeth Apollinarievna Chreptovich-Butenev (1915-89) – s.p.

1.3.7. [2] Prince Nikolai Nikolaevich Gagarin (1918-78), m.1948 Claude Henriette Robert (1929-), having had further issue, one son and three daughters.

1.3.8. [2] Prince Andrei Nikolaevich Gagarin (1923-92), m.1957 Rolande Desnoyers (1933-) – s.p.

1.4. Princess Aleksandra Viktorovna Gagarina (1876-1930), m. Ugo Epifani (-1949)

1.4.1. Anna Epifani

2. Princess Sophia Nikolaevna Gagarina (1847-1874), m.1871 Count Mikhail Nikolaevich Muraviov (1845-1900)

2.1. Countess Sophia Mikhailovna Muraviova (1872-1901), m. Aleksandr Vasilievich Dabizha (1860-1899), having had further issue, one son.

2.2.  Count Nikolai Mikhailovich Muraviov (1874-1934)

3. Princess Maria Nikolaevna Gagarina (1850-1906), m.1874 Mikhail Dmitrievich Skobelev (1843-82)

3.1. Mikhail Mikhailovich Skobelev (1877-1943), m. Ekaterina Georgievna Naryshkina (1875-1927) – s.p.

4. Prince Nikolai Nikolaevich Gagarin (1859-1918), m.1887 Tatiana Mikhailovna Chertkova (1868-1944)

4.1. Prince Nikolai Nikolaevich Gagarin (1895-1986), m.1946 Princess Ekaterina Alexeievna Lvova (1897-1986) – s.p.

4.2. Princess Kira Nikolaevna Gagarina (1897-1967), m.1st 1918 (div) Dmitry Kobylin; m.2nd 1935 George Sisterton (1880-1948) – s.p.

4.3. Princess Tatiana Nikolaevna Gagarina (1889-1893)

Sources: http://www.angelfire.com/realm/gotha/gotha/gagarin.html [8.12.2013]; http://www.gagarin.com [8.12.2013];

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, 2014

Sitter’s Identity Corrected: Portrait of Princess Lina Gagarina, 1857 (cat no 590) [Part 3]

January 3, 2014 § Leave a comment

Lina Gurieva Gagarina 1857 Winterhalter

Sitter’s Identity Corrected: Portrait of Princess Lina Gagarina, 1857 (cat no 590) [Part 3]

As it has become customary with my blog entries, here is an abbreviated ancestry of the sitter, limited to the first three generations:

  1. Princess Alexandra (Lina) Nikolaevna Gagarina, née Countess Gurieva (1825-1908)
  2. Count Nikolai Dmitrievich Guriev (1792-1849), m.
  3. Marina Dmitrievna Naryshkina (1792-1825)
  4. Count Dmitry Alexandrovich Guriev (1751-1825), m.
  5. Praskovia Nikolaevna Saltykova (-1830)
  6. Dmitry L’vovich Naryshkin (1764-1838), m.
  7. Princess Maria Antonovna Czetwertinska (1799-1854)
  8. Alexander Grigorievich Guriev, m.
  9. Anna Mikhaiovna Eropkina
  10. Nikolai Vladimirovich Saltykov (1743-1800), m.1763
  11. Princess Anna Sergeievna Gagarina (1742-1820)
  12. Lev Alexandrovich Naryshkin (1733-1799, great-nephew of Tzaritza Natalia Naryshkina, mother of Peter the Great), m.
  13. Marina Osipovna Zakrevskaia (1741-1800)
  14. Prince Anton Stanslaus Swiatopolk-Czetwertinski (1748-1794), m.
  15. Thekla Freiin von Kampenhausen (c.1750-1781)

To be continued…

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, 2014

Sitter’s Identity Corrected: Portrait of Princess Lina Gagarina, 1857 (cat no 590) [Part 2]

January 2, 2014 § 3 Comments

Lina Gurieva Gagarina 1857 Winterhalter

Sitter’s Identity Corrected: Portrait of Princess Lina Gagarina, 1857 (cat no 590) [Part 2]

The provenance research might be of assistance in identifying the sitter.

It is known that the portrait was acquired by the Uffizi in 1934 from Count Nikolai Mikhailovich Muraviov (1874-1934) (see Uffizi 1980, 686). A quick genealogical research identifies the following ancestry of the former owner of the portrait:

  1. Count Nikolai Mikhailovich Muraviov (1874-1934)
  2. Count Mikhail Nikolaevich Muraviov (1845-1900), m. 1871
  3. Princess Sophia Nikolaevna Gagarina (1847-1874)
  4. Count Nikolai Mikhailovich Muraviov (1820-1869), m. [?]
  5. Ludmilla Mikhailovna Posen (1822-c.1849)
  6. Prince Nikolai Nikolaevich Gagarin (1822/1823[?]-1902), m. 1842/1843[?]
  7. Countess Aleksandra Nikolaevna Gurieva (1825-1907[o.s.]/1908[n.s.])

Of Count Muraviov’s two grandmothers, the paternal grandmother, Ludmila Mikhailovna Posen [Людмила Михайловна Позен] is belived to have died c. 1849. Only one candidate remains, Aleksandra Nikolaevna Gurieva [Александра Николаевна Гурьева], who would have been in her early thirties when the portrait was painted.

Looking at Winterhalter’s portrait at the Uffizi, one is immediately struck just how much the woman in the portrait looks like her father, Nikolai Dmitrievich Guriev (1792-1849), in his famous portrait by Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) – reputedly the only Russian to ever have been painted by Ingres.

Jean_Auguste_Dominique_Ingres_015

The portrait, which is presently in the collection of the Hermitage Museum in St Petersburg (1821, oil on canvas, 107 x 86 cm), clearly shows that both Count Guriev and the woman in the Winterhalter portrait have similarly protruding eyes and a prominent nose – though Winterhalter has significantly idealised and regularised these features in the portrait of the woman.

So, could this be indeed Countess Aleksandra Nikolaevna Gurieva, wife of Prince Nikolai Nikolaevich Gagarin? Could ‘Lina’ be a nickname for ‘Aleksandra’?

Further research provides irrefutable proof that a lady by the name of “Lina Gagarine née Gourieff” was a prominent member of the Russian high society and court circles in the middle of the nineteenth century. Constance d’Azeglio mentions her in the Souvenirs among the women by whom she was entertained during her visit to St Petersburg in the 1840s; and Baliabin also talks of “Lina Gagarine née Gourieff” among the Russian women who frequently travelled between Paris and Baden in the middle of the nineteenth century.

On the basis of the provenance, genealogical, and bibliographical research, I propose – nay, argue – that the correct identity of the sitter in the Winterhalter portrait at the Uffizi is Princess Aleksandra (Lina) Nikolaevna Gagarina (1825-1907), née Countess Gurieva [Княгиня Александра (Лина) Николаевна Гагарина, ур. Графиня Гурьева].

To be continued…

© Eugene Barilo von Reisberg, 2014

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